6 June 13 | Chad W. Post | Comments

Copied below is all the information DW Gibson sent me about applying to participate in the Translation Lab that will be going on at the Ledig House this fall. As you can see below, the Translation Lab is a 10-day residency for four English language translators and the four authors that they’re working on. Which is an incredible opportunity. The deadline for applying is July 15th, so get on it!

Translation Lab, Fall 2013

Writers Omi at Ledig House, a part of Omi International Arts Center, has been awarded a grant from Amazon.com to fund Translation Lab 2013, a 10-day special, intensive residency for four collaborating writer-translator teams in the fall of 2013.
Writers Omi will host four English language translators at the Omi International Arts Center for 10 days. These translators will be invited along with the writers whose work is being translated. All text-based projects—fiction, nonfiction, theater, film, poetry, etc.—are eligible.

This focused residency will provide an integral stage of refinement, allowing translators to dialogue with the writers about text-specific questions. It will also serve as an essential community-builder for English-language translators who are working to increase the amount of international literature available to American readers.

The dates for Translation Lab 2013 are November 6-15, 2013. All residencies are fully funded, including airfare and local transport from New York City to the Omi International Arts Center in Ghent, NY. Please note: accepted applicants must be available for the duration of the Translation Lab (November 6-15, 2013). Late arrivals and early departures are not possible. Please do not submit a proposal unless both parties involved (translator and writer) are available for all dates.

Writers Omi will be accepting proposals for participation until July 15, 2013.

Translators, writers, editors, or agents can submit proposals. Each proposal should be no more than three pages in length and provide the following information:

  • Brief biographical sketches for the translator and writer associated with each project

  • Publishing status for proposed projects (projects that do not yet have a publisher are still eligible)

  • A description of the proposed project

  • Contact information (physical address, email, and phone)

Proposals should be submitted only once availability for residency participation of the translator and writer has been confirmed. All proposals and inquiries should be sent directly to DW Gibson, director or Writers Omi at Ledig House at: dwgibson [at] artomi.org.

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