16 December 08 | Chad W. Post | Comments

It’s not available on The Bloomsbury Review website1, but Syracuse University Press was named as the Publisher of the Year, due in great part, to its Middle East Literature in Translation Series.

In the write-up, Jeff Biggers cites both Taghi Modarressi’s The Virgin of Solitude: A Novel and Contemporary Iraqi Fiction: An Anthology (which we reviewed) as examples of the great work SUP is doing.

At a time with bookstores are overwhelmed by superficial cut-and-paste portraits of the Middle East that provide little insight into the cultures and experiences in the war-torn region, Syracuse University Press serves as a beacon of light for the publishing industry. These books deserve the widest distribution and attention possible in our country.

Congratulations to Syracuse University Press. It’s great to see a publisher honored for its commitment to international literature.

1 I swear I’m sick of repeating the same complaints, but the Bloomsbury Review website is yet another example of a publisher/magazine website that’s so out-of-date to basically be useless. Look, I’m glad you’re trying to protect your content, but this way of listing back issues is insane. And I’m 99% sure that I’ll never download a pdf, print it out, complete it, and mail/fax it in to get a subscription. Even if it’s not perfect, Google Checkout is free and very easy to install and use.

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