9 February 12 | Chad W. Post | Comments

The February newsletter from the Chinese-literature centric Paper Republic has an interesting write-up of the “Future Masters” contest—a competition organized by People’s Literature magazine, Shanda Literature, and a media company from Chengdu, to identify 20 of the best young Chinese writers.

Here’s a link to the Paper Republic news item, and listed below you’ll find the list of the 20 authors along with links to any info about them available on Paper Republic.

  • Di An 笛安
  • Qiao Ye 乔叶
  • Lu Min 鲁敏
  • Ge Liang 葛亮
  • Zhu Wenying 朱文颖
  • Li Hao 李浩
  • Wang Shiyue 王十月
  • Tangjia Sanshao 唐家三少
  • Cai Jun 蔡骏
  • Yan Ge 颜歌
  • Ji Wenjun 计文君
  • Teng Xiaolan 滕肖澜
  • Lu Kui 吕魁
  • Zhang Chu 张楚
....
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