18 September 09 | Chad W. Post | Comments

I went on this trip a couple of years ago (and wrote about it and the U.S. Embassy back in the early days of Three Percent), and can’t recommend it highly enough. Amazing experience and the best opportunity I know of to really find out about Argentine literature. Not to mention, Gabriela Adamo does a brilliant job organizing this and is an incredible woman. Plus, there’s the tango!

So if you’re fluent in Spanish (or sort of fluent in Spanish), you should definitely apply:

For seven years now, Fundación TyPA has been working to make Argentine literature better known around the world. Seventy professionals from many different countries have already taken part in our programme. They visited Buenos Aires, established first-hand contact with the local publishing world and discovered astounding books they’re now publishing on their own. Today, many Argentine books can be found in bookstores in Paris, Berlin, Rome, London, Sao Paulo, New York, Athens, Zurich, Tel Aviv, Amsterdam…

In 2010, Argentina will both be guest of honor at the Frankfurt Bookfair and celebrate it’s 200 years of Independence with an ongoing stream of cultural events. We are happy to be a part of it and are looking for the most talented and open-minded publishers to invite.

DATE: From Sunday, April 18, to Saturday, April 24.

ORGANIZED BY: Fundación TyPA

WITH THE SUPPORT OF: Fundación El Libro (Buenos Aires Bookfair) and the embassies of Brazil, Israel and Italy, among other institutions.

DESCRIPTION: Ten publishers are invited to spend a week in Buenos Aires, where they will listen to talks about contemporary Argentine literature, meet authors, critics and journalists, visit publishing houses, bookstores and cultural centres. There will also be special meetings as requested by the participants.
The grants offered by TyPA include lodging and food, local transportation and all organizational costs. There is also a limited number of complete grants, which include the air tickets to Argentina.

WHO SHOULD APPLY: Publishers and acquisition editors working with translated fiction. We may also consider a limited number of applications by translators and critics. Candidates should be able to read and understand Spanish in order to profit from the visit, since most events will be held in that language.

HOW TO APPLY: Send a brief CV and a letter explaining why you would like to apply to: gadamo [at] typa.org.ar.

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS: Friday, October 30, 2009.

ANNOUNCEMENT OF PARTICIPANTS: Monday, December 21, 2009

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