10 August 09 | Chad W. Post | Comments

Just got a message from Riky Stock at the German Book Office that there are still a few openings for this year’s Frankfurt Book Fair International Booksellers Program. Similar to the editor’s trip, this program helps introduce booksellers from around the world to their German counterparts. Somewhat geared towards people interested in importing and selling German books, but I can only imagine that any perceptive bookseller would get a lot out of this sort of trip and the various meetings with international booksellers.

Anyway, here’s the info she sent me:

The international programme provides foreign booksellers with an insight into the functions and structures of the German book trade, enabling them to efficiently organise their import and sales of German books. The programme promotes dialogue with other booksellers, German publishers and wholesalers and helps participants to create their own network.

In addition to the attendance at the Frankfurt Book Fair and visits to German publishing companies the programme includes an introduction to the German book market, one day of work experience in a bookshop, two visits to wholesalers as well as cultural activities.

All visits will be supported by presentations given during the seminar. Participants will be able to report about their home countries’ book markets. Time is allowed for in depth exchanges of experience between participants, speakers and organisers.

Booksellers Programme 2009

Organizer: Ausstellungs- und Messe-GmbH / Frankfurt Book Fair

Funded by: Foreign Office, Frankfurt Book Fair

Date: 15 – 22 October 2009

Participants: booksellers from non-German speaking regions with an interest in importing German books

Seminar language: English

Costs for participants: € 290,- incl. VAT;
Travel expenses to Germany and back home are excluded.
Room, board and local transport is taken care of by the organiser.

Contact: Nadja Mortensen: mortensen at book-fair dot com

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