30 October 13 | Chad W. Post | Comments

The British Centre for Literary Translation—located in Norwich at the University of East Anglia—recently launched a search for a new director. You can get all of the information here, but here’s a brief summary of what sounds like one of the coolest translation-related positions ever:

Apply now for the post of BCLT Academic Director

£45,941 to £53,233 per annum

The School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing is seeking to appoint an Academic Director for the British Centre for Literary Translation.

The Centre is a vital point of intersection between professional translation and academic study, founded in 1989 by W.G. Sebald and supported by the University of East Anglia and Arts Council England.

This is an exciting opportunity to shape the next phase of its development in the context offered by UEA’s internationally famous Creative Writing programme and Norwich’s status as England’s first UNESCO City of Literature.

The Academic Director will be a Senior Lecturer in the School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing, engaging in both undergraduate and postgraduate teaching and published research.

The post is available on a full-time indefinite basis from 1 March 2014.

The closing date is 12 noon on 22 November 2013.

And from the job description PDF, here’s a paragraph about the scope of the job:

The Academic Director will be responsible for leading the academic programme of BCLT through teaching, research and organisation, ensuring that the academic and public programmes complement and gain from each other, and acting as advocate for the role and activities of BCLT within UEA. S/he will have particular responsibility for raising BCLT’s academic profile, and developing its academic activity to parallel the well-established outreach programming.

I feel like there’s probably a number of readers of this blog who would qualify for such a position . . .

23 January 13 | Chad W. Post | Comments

I just found out that And Other Stories, arguable the hottest and most successful new publisher of the past few years, is looking to hire a NY-based part-time publicity director.

You can read the whole ad at that link (and it’s nothing like that other job listing from last month), but here’s the basics:

And Other Stories is an award-winning two-year-old publisher of literary writing based in the UK. We are now establishing a North American presence, largely in response to increasing interest in our titles in North America. We published Deborah Levy’s 2012 Man Booker Prize shortlisted Swimming Home (since bought by Bloomsbury USA) among other titles. We have a particularly strong list of Latin American titles, as our publisher Stefan Tobler is a translator from Portuguese (and German) while our editor Sophie Lewis works from Rio de Janeiro.

From September 2013 our new titles will be represented and distributed in North America by Consortium. We are recruiting a North American Director of Publicity to set up a home office for us in New York. The publicist will become a key part of the team. We want someone who reads widely and can speak with passion and pleasure about our books, and who is looking to stay with And Other Stories as we develop. And Other Stories has good experience of co-ordinating remote work, as our staff live in various locations. We offer an induction of two to three weeks in our main UK office at the start of the job (probably in April), so that the new person can work with the other team members and feel grounded in the role and connected to the team when back in New York. The publisher will also be in New York on occasion for face-to-face meetings.

Responsibilities

- developing a PR strategy

- galleys mail-outs and related pitching and follow-up on titles

- maintaining contacts databases for publicity

- writing and sending out press releases

- working with editor to find best use in the media for advance extracts, shorter pieces, introductions etc

- reporting on media coverage

- contributing to Facebook and other social media activity, incl our new blog Ampersand

- seeking friends and blurbs for specific authors or books where appropriate, and building relationships for And Other Stories in general

Send your CV and salary requirements to Stefan Tobler at info[at]andotherstories.org with ‘North American Publicity’ in the subject line by Friday 15th February 2013.

15 August 08 | Chad W. Post | Comments

We don’t post a lot of job info here at Three Percent, but every once in a while when something particularly interesting comes along, I feel like I should pass it on.

Well, yesterday afternoon I got this e-mail from the Polish Cultural Institute in New York:

It is my pleasure to let you know that the Polish Cultural Institute in New York is growing and will be able to develop its literature program significantly. We are currently seeking a person for a full-time position of a literature programmer. I take this liberty to send the job description / requirements to you because I know that the best people are always found through a word of mouth and you may very well know a Polish-American (or an maybe even an American speaking Polish!) who would be interested. If so, please pass the attachment forward. Hence the knowledge of Polish is required, the attachment is in Polish. But we’re only seeking for a person based here, not in Poland.

Please, pass it to anyone who could be interested.

Thank you!

Monika Fabijanska
Director
Polish Cultural Institute

Not only is this a cool job, it’s great to know that the PCI is expanding . . .

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