14 June 07 | Chad W. Post |

I’m a big fan of Vila-Matas—as can probably be deduced from the reviews of his books that we just posted—and am thrilled to have the chance to see him read with Paul Auster next Thursday at the Cervantes Institute in New York.

The event is free and open to the public, so anyone interested in great, fun literature should definitely check this out.

The Cervantes Institute is at 211-215 East 49th St., and the event starts at 7pm.

And I can’t recommend Vila-Matas enough. He’s one of those rare authors who is incredibly literary and erudite, without being the least bit boring. His books are incredibly funny and informative, and the narrators are very memorable, relating their anger and isolation is a way that’s warm, funny, and very compelling.

The closest comparison I can think of in terms of style is Marcel Benabou, whose Why I Have Not Written Any of My Books is another of the most inventive novels of the past twenty years.

There’s some info on Vila-Matas (in Spanish) at Wikipedia, and New Directions has a bit more info on their site..

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