5 January 11 | N. J. Furl | Comments

Since last year’s MLA party was shut down by the man hotel security, this year we’ve decided to go all weak and have our reception at the Open Letter/Counterpath book (#237) from 5-7 on Saturday, January 8th.

So, if you happen to be in L.A. this weekend for the MLA, please feel free to stop by. There will be a bunch of wine and a couple “Italian Antipasto Platters.” And while you’re there, you can check out ALL the Open Letter books published so far, along with all the Counterpath titles.



6 February 09 | Chad W. Post | Comments

The Best Translated Book of 2008 Award Party will take place on Thursday, February 19th from 7 to 9:00pm, and you’re all invited.

We’re having the party at Melville House Books at 145 Plymouth St. in Brooklyn. (To get there take the F train to York Street, the first stop in Brooklyn.)

Francisco Goldman will be hosting the event, and will announce the fiction and poetry winners for 2008. (The complete list of finalists is below.) We’ll also have appetizers and drinks . . .

If you think you’re going to make it, please RSVP either at the Facebook page or by e-mailing me at chad.post at rochester dot edu. (You don’t need to RSVP to get in, but we’d really like to have some idea of how many people will be there . . . This is going to be a lot of fun.)

Fiction Finalists:

Tranquility by Attila Bartis
translated from the Hungarian by Imre Goldstein
(Archipelago)

2666 by Roberto Bolaño
translated from the Spanish by Natasha Wimmer
(Farrar, Straus & Giroux)

Nazi Literature in the Americas by Roberto Bolaño
translated from the Spanish by Chris Andrews
(New Directions)

Voice Over by Céline Curiol
translated from the French by Sam Richard
(Seven Stories)

The Darkroom of Damocles by Willem Frederik Hermans
translated from the Dutch by Ina Rilke
(Overlook)

Yalo by Elias Khoury
translated from the Arabic by Peter Theroux
(Archipelago)

Senselessness by Horacio Castellanos Moya
translated from the Spanish by Katherine Silver
(New Directions)

Unforgiving Years by Victor Serge
translated from the French by Richard Greeman
(New York Review Books)

Bonsai by Alejandro Zambra
translated from the Spanish by Carolina De Robertis
(Melville House)

The Post-Office Girl by Stefan Zweig
translated from the German by Joel Rotenberg
(New York Review Books)

Poetry Finalists:

Essential Poems and Writings by Robert Desnos
translated from the French by Mary Ann Caws, Terry Hale, Bill Zavatsky, Martin Sorrell, Jonathan Eburne, Katherine Connelly, Patricia Terry, and Paul Auster
(Black Widow)

You Are the Business by Caroline Dubois
translated from the French by Cole Swensen
(Burning Deck)

As It Turned Out by Dmitry Golynko
translated from the Russian by Eugene Ostashevsky, Rebecca Bella, and Simona Schneider
(Ugly Duckling)

For the Fighting Spirit of the Walnut by Takashi Hiraide
translated from the Japanese by Sawako Nakayasu
(New Directions)

Poems of A.O. Barnabooth by Valery Larbaud
translated from the French by Ron Padgett & Bill Zavatsky
(Black Widow)

Night Wraps the Sky by Vladimir Mayakovsky
translated from the Russian by Katya Apekina, Val Vinokur, and Matvei Yankelevich, and edited by Michael Almereyda
(Farrar, Straus & Giroux)

A Different Practice by Fredrik Nyberg
translated from the Swedish by Jennifer Hayashida
(Ugly Duckling)

EyeSeas by Raymond Queneau
translated from the French by Daniela Hurezanu and Stephen Kessler
(Black Widow)

Peregrinary by Eugeniusz Tkaczyszyn-Dycki
translated from the Polish by Bill Johnston
(Zephyr)

Eternal Enemies by Adam Zagajewski
translated from the polish by Clare Cavanagh
(Farrar, Straus & Giroux)

14 January 09 | Chad W. Post | Comments

Just so happens I’m going to be in New York for this, and will definitely be attending:

Thursday, January 29
Reading & Launch Party Reception
6:30–8:30pm

Co-sponsored by NYU’s MFA Program in Creative Writing in Spanish

Contributors to BOMB 106 read in both Spanish and English. Featuring the work of two of Chile’s leading poets: Raúl Zurita (in a rare U.S. appearance), his translator Anna Deeny, and Nicanor Parra, as read by his translator Liz Werner.

They are joined by the acclaimed Argentine novelist Sergio Chejfec and his translator, Margaret Carson, reading excerpts from Chejfec’s first work to appear in English, My Two Worlds, and the fresh, new voice of Chilean novelist Lina Meruane.

There are lots of reasons to attend, not the least of which is the fact that Sergio Chejfec and his translator, Margaret Carson, will be there. Scott Esposito brough Chejfec to my attention, after Enrique Vila-Matas named Chejfec’s Los incompletos his book of the year, and compared Chejfec to Walser and Sebald. . . . Coincidentally (in an awesome way), an excerpt of Chejfec’s work is in the BOMB’s latest “First Proof” supplement.

28 January 08 | Chad W. Post | Comments

We don’t usually post event info here, but based on the nature of (and Three Percent/Open Letter connection to) this event, I think it’s definitely worth highlighting.

All this info is repeated below, but as part of the Association of Writers & Writing Programs conference (a.k.a. AWP), the Center for the Art of Translation is hosting a happy hour on Friday night at the Times Square Information Center (really).

Here are all the details:

World Literature at the Crossroads

Translation Happy Hour and Reading

The Center for the Art of Translation invites you to a celebration of global voices in Times Square with acclaimed authors and translators from 15 years of TWO LINES: World Writing in Translation, including:

  • Suzanne Jill Levine reading JORGE VOLPI (from Spanish)
  • Geoffrey Brock reading GUIDO GOZZANO (from Italian)
  • Alexis Levitin reading ASTRID CABRAL (from Portuguese)
  • Susan Bernofsky reading YOKO TAWADA (from German)
  • Trudy Balch reading MATILDA KOEN-SARANO (from Ladino)
  • Douglas Basford reading JEAN SENAC (from French)

as well as Luisa Igloria reading from Tagalog and Erica Weitzman reading from Albanian

and C.M. Mayo with a tribute to special guest GREGORY RABASSA

Gregory Rabassa will be signing copies of our latest anthology, New World/New Words: Recent Writing from the Americas.

Refreshments will be served.

Join us to toast world literature and translation in the beautifully-restored landmark Embassy Movie Theatre on 7th Avenue, at the crossroads of the world!

Friday February 1, 2008
6:30-8:00 pm
Times Square Information Center
1560 Broadway (7th Avenue between 46th and 47th Streets)
Free

For more information about this event and the TWO LINES World Library, visit www.catranslation.org.

Should be an amazing event, and I’ll definitely be there—along with other Reading the World publishers—this line-up is pretty amazing. . . . And it’s always fun to party with international lit people. Not to mentiuon, Open Letter will be publishing Jorge Volpi’s No Sera la Tierra in the fall of 2009, and an excerpt from Vilnius Poker by Ricardas Gavelis (forthcoming from OL in Feb 2009) is in the next issue of Two Lines . . . (One of these days we’ll post a complete list of our forthcoming books.)

Anyway, I hope to meet some of you there . . .

....
The Skin
The Skin by Curzio Malaparte
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