25 November 09 | N. J. Furl | Comments

Our 2 for $22 deal (pick 2 Open Letter books for $22 flat, and you’re automatically entered to win a year of free books) is coming to a close, so if you haven’t checked it out—or did and were planning to order later—now is the time . . .

28 October 09 | N. J. Furl | Comments

I know it feels like like self-promotion day on Three Percent, but this bit of promotion is important . . . really (at least to those of you who’ve written in asking about it).

The other week we launched an awesomely great deal with a catchy name: 2 for $22. The deal is this:
Choose any 2 books for $22 flat (not even shipping, if you’re in the U.S.). In addition, and you’ll be automatically entered to win a free subscription to a full year of Open Letter titles (or, if you’re already a subscriber, you could get your current subscription extended for an additional free year). So, that’s a potential of 12 beautiful books for $22. Not bad.

Over the past week or so, we’ve heard from a bunch of you that the ordering page was causing them problems, so we pulled it down until we could get it all worked out . . . This brings me to today: It’s all worked out!

You can go here to check it out and maybe pick some books and enter the free subscription drawing.

By the way, this offer is only open until Nov. 15 . . .

15 October 09 | N. J. Furl | Comments

Don’t forget that we’re still in the midst of our 2 for $22 deal.

Choose any 2 books for $22 flat, and you’re automatically entered to win a free subscription for a full year of Open Letter titles (or, if you’re already a subscriber, you could get your current subscription extended for an additional free year). That’s a potential of 12 books for $22, which has an original retail value of $$$.

9 October 09 | Chad W. Post | Comments

In celebration of our thirteen-month anniversary, we’re offering a special on all twelve of the titles we’ve published so far: from now until November can buy any 2 Open Letter books for $22. And when you do (and hopefully you will—this is a killer bargain!), you’ll automatically be entered into a drawing to win a free one-year subscription.

(So, if you’re one of those lucky people, you could end up with 12 books for $22 . . . )

And if I might make a suggestion: I would highly recommend getting a copy of Jan Kjaerstad’s The Discoverer. The book just came out and is going to be reviewed in the October 25th issue of the New York Times Book Review. (Our first Times review!) And as a sneak preview, next week we’ll be serializing a chunk of the novel on the website . . .

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Kingdom Cons
Kingdom Cons by Yuri Herrera
Reviewed by Sarah Booker

Yuri Herrera is overwhelming in the way that he sucks readers into his worlds, transporting them to a borderland that is at once mythical in its construction and powerfully recognizable as a reflection of its modern-day counterpart. Kingdom Cons, originally. . .

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The Invented Part
The Invented Part by Rodrigo Fresán
Reviewed by Tiffany Nichols

Imagine reading a work that suddenly and very accurately calls out you, the reader, for not providing your full attention to the act of reading. Imagine how embarrassing it is when you, the reader, believe that you are engrossed in. . .

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A Simple Story: The Last Malambo
A Simple Story: The Last Malambo by Leila Guerriero
Reviewed by Emilee Brecht

Leila Guerriero’s A Simple Story: The Last Malambo chronicles the unique ferocity of a national dance competition in Argentina. The dance, called the malambo, pushes the physical and mental limits of male competitors striving to become champions of not only. . .

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The Little Buddhist Monk & The Proof
The Little Buddhist Monk & The Proof by Cesar Aira
Reviewed by Will Eells

Aira continues to surprise and delight in his latest release from New Directions, which collects two novellas: the first, The Little Buddhist Monk, a fairly recent work from 2005, and The Proof, an earlier work from 1989. There are a. . .

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Agnes
Agnes by Peter Stamm
Reviewed by Dorian Stuber

The narrator of Peter Stamm’s first novel, Agnes, originally published in 1998 and now available in the U.S. in an able translation by Michael Hofmann, is a young Swiss writer who has come to Chicago to research a book on. . .

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Class
Class by Francesco Pacifico
Reviewed by Vincent Francone

The thing about Class is that I don’t know what the hell to think about it, yet I can’t stop thinking about it. I’ll begin by dispensing with the usual info that one may want to know when considering adding. . .

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The Dispossessed
The Dispossessed by Szilárd Borbély
Reviewed by Jason Newport

To be, or not to be?

Hamlet’s enduring question is one that Szilárd Borbély, acclaimed Hungarian poet, verse-playwright, librettist, essayist, literary critic, short-story writer, and, finally, novelist, answered sadly in the negative, through his suicide in 2014, at the. . .

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