15 February 08 | E.J. Van Lanen | Comments

The exiled Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasrin, who is accused of insulting Islam, will be allowed to stay in India it emerged today – but only if she remains in a government flat in a secret location in Delhi, unable to receive visitors or step outside her door.

20 August 07 | Chad W. Post | Comments

The continuing saga of Bangladeshi author Taslima Nasrin has taken another turn for the worse (here’s a recap of the situation) and in addition to facing criminal charges for her “anti-Islamic” views, there’s now a warrant out for her death:

Muslim clerics in eastern India issued a “death warrant” on Friday against controversial Bangladeshi author Taslima Nasrin, threatening her life if she did not leave the country where she lives in exile.

Although one prominent cleric said Nasrin had a month to leave, another said she had 15 days. Anyone who killed her would get a cash reward of 100,000 rupees ($2,400), they said.

14 August 07 | Chad W. Post | Comments

Last week, E.J. posted about poet and novelist Taslima Nasrin, who was attacked at her book launch.

Well, according to today’s Arts, Briefly in the New York Times things have gotten even crazier:

The Bangladeshi author Taslima Nasreen will face criminal charges for what the authorities called her anti-Islamic views, which prompted an attack against her by Muslims last week in central India, Agence France-Presse reported. A police official in the city of Hyderabad said Ms. Nasreen faced a charge of “hurting Muslim feelings.” [. . . ] Under Indian law, promoting “disharmony or feelings of enmity, hatred or ill will” between religious groups is punishable by up to three years in jail.

9 August 07 | E.J. Van Lanen | Comments [1]

The poet and novelist Taslima Nasrin has been attacked at the launch of her book Shodh (Getting Even) in the south Indian state of Tamil Nadu.

Reports suggest that a crowd of between 20 and 100 protesters, led by three local politicians (MLAs) belonging to the Majlis-e-Ittehadul Muslimeen (MIM) party, burst into the Hyderabad press club shouting slogans describing Nasrin as “anti-Muslim” and “anti-Islam”. They ransacked the venue, throwing chairs and overturning tables, as well as reportedly slapping the writer in the ensuing melee.

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