28 February 13 | Chad W. Post | Comments

Less than one week before we announce the fiction longlist for the Best Translated Book Award (I have three more pre-announcements posts in the works to whet your appetite), but in the meantime, the French-American Foundation just announced the finalists for their Translation Prize.

The French-American Foundation received 64 submissions to the Translation Prize this year from more than 35 American publishers. . . . There will be one Fiction and one Non-Fiction prize presented at the annual Awards Ceremony on June 5 in New York. Each winning translator will receive a $10,000 cash prize funded by the Florence Gould Foundation.

The jury, which includes Linda Asher, David Bellos, Linda Coverdale, Emmanuelle Ertel and Lorin Stein, has selected the best English translations of French works published in 2012.

Here’s the list of the Fiction Finalists (descriptions theirs):

No One by Gwenaëlle Aubry and translated by Trista Selous (Tin House Books)

No One is a fictional memoir in dictionary form that investigates the unstable identity of the author’s father, a lawyer affected by a disabling bipolar disorder. Letter by letter, Aubry gives shape and meaning to the father who had long disappeared from her view.

We Monks and Soldiers by Lutz Bassmann and translated by Jordan Stump (University of Nebraska Press)

While humanity seems to be fading around them, the members of a shadowy organization are doing their inadequate best to assist those experiencing their last moments. This remarkable work offers readers a thrilling entry into Bassmann’s numinous world.

HHhH by Laurent Binet and translated by Sam Taylor (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

A seemingly effortlessly blend of historical truth, personal memory, and Laurent Binet’s remarkable imagination, HHhH—a winner of the prestigious Prix Goncourt du Premier Roman—is a work at once thrilling and intellectually engrossing, a fast-paced novel of the Second World War.

Prehistoric Times by Eric Chevillard and translated by Alyson Waters (Archipelago Books)

The characters in Prehistoric Times remind us of the inhabitants of Samuel Beckett’s world: dreamers who in their savage and deductive folly try to modify reality.

With the Animals by Noëlle Revaz and translated by W. Donald Wilson (Dalkey Archive Press)

With the Animals, Noëlle Revaz’s shocking debut, is a novel of mud and blood whose linguistic audaciousness is matched only by its brutality, misanthropy, and gallows humor.

And for those of you who have read this far in this post, you should know that two of those five titles made the Best Translated Book Award fiction longlist . . .

7 April 11 | Chad W. Post | Comments

The nominees for the 30th annual Northern California Book Awards were announced yesterday, in advance of the award ceremony taking place on April 10th at Koret Auditorium in the San Francisco Main Library.

Nine awards are given out as part of this celebration, including ones for Best Fiction Translation and Best Poetry Translation. That in itself is cool and worth noting, but in addition, it’s extra cool that this year’s nominees includes an Open Letter title . . .

The site is a bit ca. 1999, but you can click here to see all the nominees. For now, here’s the list of translation finalists:

Fiction

  • Translation from Italian by Anne Milano Appel of Blindly by Claudio Magris (Penguin Group (Canada))
  • Translation from Polish by David Frick of A Thousand Peaceful Cities by Jerzy Pilch (Open Letter Books)
  • Translation from German by Damion Searls of Comedy in a Minor Key by Hans Keilson (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

Poetry

  • Translation from Germany by Kurt Beals of engulf-enkindle by Anja Utler (Burning Deck)
  • Translation from Spanish by Joshua Edwards of Ficticia by María Baranda (Shearsman Books)
  • Translation from Greek by John Sakkis and Angelos Sakkis of Maribor by Demosthenes Agrafiotis (The Post-Apollo Press)

Congrats to all! (And David Frick should win.)

6 April 11 | Chad W. Post | Comments

The Florence Gould Foundation and the French-American Foundation recently announced the finalists for this, the 24th annual, French Translation Prizes. Winners will be announced in May at a swanky event, and they’ll each receive $10,000.

You can find more details about the history of the prize, etc., by clicking here, but here’s the bit you’re probably more interested in:

Finalists for Fiction

  • Mitzi Angel for 03 by Jean-Christophe Valtat (Farrar, Straus & Giroux)
  • Alexander Hertich for Dying by René Belletto (Dalkey Archive Press)
  • Anna Moschovakis for The Jokers by Albert Cossery (New York Review of Books)
  • Lydia Davis for Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert (Viking/Penguin Group)
  • Alison Anderson for A Novel Bookstore by Laurence Cossé (Europa Editions)

Finalists for Non-Fiction

  • David Fernbach for The Invention of Paris: A History in Footsteps by Eric Hazan (Verso Books)
  • Frederick Brown for Letters from America by Alexis de Tocqueville (Yale University
    Press)
  • Donald Nicholson-Smith for Letters to Madeleine by Guillaume Apollinaire (Seagull
    Books)
  • Jane Marie Todd for Reading and Writing in Babylon by Dominique Charpin (Harvard University Press)
  • A. Kaiser for A Wall in Palestine by René Backmann (Picador)

Jurors for this year’s competition include Linda Asher, David Bellos, Antoine Compagnon, Linda Coverdale, Jeannette Seaver and Lily Tuck.

Congrats to everyone, and it’s really cool to see Anna Moschovakis on here for the BTBA finalist, The Jokers.

I usually avoid whinging about any of these awards (because yes, I know how hard, etc.), but I’m a bit stunned that Charlotte Mandell isn’t on here for Zone. Not that I know whose place she would take, but damn, Zone is an intense undertaking and Charlotte pulled it off in, um, award winning fashion.

20 August 10 | Chad W. Post | Comments [1]

I just received an invitation to the award ceremony for the French-American Foundation & Florence Gould Foundation Annual Translation Prizes, and since I think I missed the announcement of the finalists, I thought I’d take this chance to congratulate all ten translators being honored.

Fiction:

John Cullen for Brodeck by Philippe Claudel (Nan A. Talese/Doubleday)

C. Dickson for Desert by J.M.G. Le Clezio (David R. Godine Publishing)

Richard Howard for Alien Hearts by Guy de Maupassant (New York Review Books)

Charlotte Mandell for The Kindly Ones by Jonathan Littell (HarperCollins)

Richard Sieburth for The Salt Smugglers by Gerard de Nerval (Archipelago Books)


Nonfiction:

Beverley Bie Brahic for This Incredible Need to Believe by Julia Kristeva (Columbia University Press)

M.B. DeBevoise for Manichaeism by Michel Tardieu (University of Illinois Press)

Jody Gladding for On the Death and Life of Languages by Claude Hagege (Yale University Press/Odile Jacob)

George Holoch for Orphans of the Republic by Olivier Wieviorka (Harvard University Press)

Loic Wacquant for Prisons of Poverty by Loic Wacquant (University of Minnesota Press)

Great list of translators/books/publishers . . .

The prizes will be given out on Thursday, September 16th at a special event at the Gallery at the Century Association. For more information about the awards (and how to attend the ceremony/reception—which is always quite stunning) contact Sierra Schaller at sschaller [at] frenchamerican [dot] org.

27 May 09 | Chad W. Post | Comments

Last night the French-American Foundation and Gould Foundation held their annual translation prize ceremony, honoring Jody Gladding & Elizabeth Deshays in the fiction category for their translation of Small Lives by Pierre Michon (Archipelago) and Matthew Cobb & Malcolm Debevoise in nonfiction for their translation of Life Explained by Michel Morange (Yale University Press)

As Thomas Bishop pointed out in his opening remarks, it’s interesting that both winners were translated by a pair of translators. Not that this is necessarily good or bad, just interesting. He also gave a shout out to American university presses as one of the admirable publishing segments of the book business trying to do a lot of literature in translation.

Of the finalists for the nonfiction category, four of the five titles were published by university presses (the exception being Camus’s Notebooks that came out from Ivan R. Dee). The fiction category had a different make-up, but three of the six finalists were from independent presses (Archipelago, Europa Editions, and New York Review Books).

The event—which took place at the Century Association—was very well attended (standing room only!), filled with all the editors, agents, translators, and other cultural peoples involved in international lit. (Especially French literature. One of the cool things the FAF did, which I’ve never seen before, is hand out a printed list of all RSVPs, so attendees could see who else was supposedly there and seek them out . . . Actually sort of helpful for a reception of this sort, where you’re only one or two connections away from everyone else . . .

27 May 09 | Chad W. Post | Comments

Last night the French-American Foundation and Gould Foundation held their annual translation prize ceremony, honoring Jody Gladding & Elizabeth Deshays in the fiction category for their translation of Small Lives by Pierre Michon (Archipelago) and Matthew Cobb & Malcolm Debevoise in nonfiction for their translation of Life Explained by Michel Morange (Yale University Press)

As Thomas Bishop pointed out in his opening remarks, it’s interesting that both winners were translated by a pair of translators. Not that this is necessarily good or bad, just interesting. He also gave a shout out to American university presses as one of the admirable publishing segments of the book business trying to do a lot of literature in translation.

Of the finalists for the nonfiction category, four of the five titles were published by university presses (the exception being Camus’s Notebooks that came out from Ivan R. Dee). The fiction category had a different make-up, but three of the six finalists were from independent presses (Archipelago, Europa Editions, and New York Review Books).

The event—which took place at the Century Association—was very well attended (standing room only!), filled with all the editors, agents, translators, and other cultural peoples involved in international lit. (Especially French literature. One of the cool things the FAF did, which I’ve never seen before, is hand out a printed list of all RSVPs, so attendees could see who else was supposedly there and seek them out . . . Actually sort of helpful for a reception of this sort, where you’re only one or two connections away from everyone else . . .

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