11 April 12 | Chad W. Post | Comments

This morning, Judge Jeff and I were on the local morning news show to talk about the 2012 Best Translated Book Award finalists.

And even though it’s not even noon, I highly recommend using this as a drinking game . . . Every time Judge Jeff looks directly into the camera, do a shot. And do a double if he looks in there and smiles.

25 March 11 | Chad W. Post | Comments

Always fun going on the CW to talk about international literature. And I have to admit, I’m always surprised that they keep inviting us back . . .

In order of mention, here are the books that were discussed:

Time of Sky & Castles in the Air by Ayane Kawata, translated from the Japanese by Sawako Nakayasu (Litmus Press)

The Book of Things by Aleš Šteger, translated from the Slovenian by Brian Henry (BOA Editions)

The Literary Conference by César Aira, translated from the Spanish by Katherine Silver (New Directions) (Why This Book Should Win)

The Jokers by Albert Cossery, translated from the French by Anna Moschovakis (New York Review Books) (Why This Book Should Win)

Hocus Bogus by Romain Gary (writing as Émile Ajar), translated from the French by David Bellos (Yale University Press) (Why This Book Should Win)

Agaat by Marlene Van Niekerk, translated from the Afrikaans by Michiel Heyns (Tin House) (Why This Book Should Win)

....
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