26 November 12 | Chad W. Post | Comments

Every year, Archipelago Books—one of the country’s finest independent presses—hosts a mindblowingly incredible1 fundraising auction. This year’s event, which Don DeLillo, Rick Moody, and Nicole Krauss would like to invite you to, is taking place this Thursday at Poets House (10 River Terrace), starting at 7pm.

Here’s a bit more info from their announcement:

tickets: $25 in advance, $35 at the door
with food, wine, and live music
first 100 ticketed guests receive a gift bag stocked with goodies, including literary magazines, discounts on cultural offerings and restaurants, and more!
out of towners and early birds can make advance bids here

for more information, visit our auction tumblr

If you’re planning on going, and would like to spread the word, you can visit the Facebook event page, and share this with all of your friends.

1 This is hearsay, seeing that I’ve never actually made it to NYC for any of these, and besides, I work for a university, so my auction bidding abilities are pretty hampered.

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